Volume-54 | Issue-1(January-March)| Year 2022

Trends in global herbicides research during 2011-2020: A web of science-based scientometric study
A. Jamaludheen, Prem Chand, K.V. Praveen, P. Krishnan and P.K. Singh

KEYWORDS:

Bibliometric analysis, Herbicide research, Scientometric study, VOSviewer, Web of Science

Abstract:

Herbicides are continuing to be an integral part of weed control in global agriculture and hence the research related to herbicides have paramount importance. Therefore, the present study attempts a scientometric analysis of global herbicide research undertaken during the last decade (2011 to 2020). For this, we collected the bibliometric data on published literature from the ISI Web of science core collection database in March 2021. A combination of search strings was used to obtain the appropriate data on herbicide research and VOSviewer was used for analyzing the networks among authors, organizations, journals, and countries. The study showed that 9,980 research papers were published on herbicide research with an average citation per article of 9.94 during this period. The volume of publications exhibited an increasing trend over the years. Further, the leading countries involved in the herbicide research domain were the USA, China and Brazil. The co-occurrence analysis of author keywords indicted “herbicide resistance” as the most focussed field in the herbicide research domain.

Email

ajamaludheen@gmail.com

Address

ICAR- Directorate of Weed Research, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh 482004, India
The opportunities and challenges for harvest weed seed control (HWSC) in India: An opinion
S. Vijayakumar, Anil Kumar Choudhary, M. Deiveegan, E. Subramanian, Ekta Joshi, B. Raghavendra Goud, T. Selva Kumar

KEYWORDS:

Direct-seeded rice, Harvest Weed Seed Control, HWSC, Weed seedbank, Zero tillage

Abstract:

Weeds which are escaped during the control measures are one of the source of soil weed seedbank. At the time of crop harvest, several weed species retain a considerable quantity of their seed. These weed seeds are evenly spread across the crop field through various weed seed dispersal mechanisms. By knowing the weed seed retention character of every weed species, their effective weed control can be achieved by the collection and/or destruction of weed seeds during crop harvest using harvest weed seed control (HWSC) methods. Narrow windrow burning, chaff tramlining, chaff carts, chaff lining, the Harrington seed destructor (HSD) and the bale direct system are common HWSC procedures. The crop harvest is a primary contributor to the transmission of weed seeds over the crop fields and with HWSC, we can now skip this process and prevent weed seed spread. This strategy is useful to target weed species that retain a large part of their seed after maturity and was found highly effective in controlling the spread of herbicide resistant weed seeds. HWSC aims to prevent the mature weeds seed from entering the seedbank. Through HWSC, we can prevent the enrichment of soil weed seedbanks and deplete existing soil weed seedbanks in long run. In India, the scope for HWSC is high in organic farming, direct-seeded rice, zero-till wheat, herbicide tolerant rice and high intensive irrigated agriculture while its scope is much limited in rainfed agriculture. However, the efforts on using HWSC are yet to begin in India and should be initiated.

Email

vijitnau@gmail.com

Address

ICAR-Indian Institute of Rice Research, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500030, India
Weed dynamics and crops productivity as influenced by diverse cropping systems in eastern India
Rakesh Kumar, Narendra Kumawat, J.S. Mishra*, Dibakar Ghosh, Sonaka Ghosh, A.K. Choudhary and Ujjwal Kumar1

KEYWORDS:

Cropping systems, Weed flora, Weed management, Weed seedbank, Zero-tillage

Abstract:

The study of weed dynamics in diverse cropping systems helps to formulate the strategies for effective management of weeds. Hence, this study was conducted to assess the effect of diverse cropping systems on weed dynamics and crops productivity in eastern India. The minimum total weed density (4.85 no./m2) and biomass (2.43 g/m2) during rainy season crops was recorded in fodder sorghum-mustard-blackgram systems. In winter crops, the lowest total weed density was observed in soybean-maize system (5.79 no./m2), while the lowest weed biomass (2.26 g/m2) with finger millet-rapeseed (toria) system. In summer, soybean-maize, pearl millet-chickpea and sorghum-chickpea were equally effective for reducing weed density and biomass. Weed seedbank analysis revealed maximum grass weed seed density at 0-15 cm depth in foxtail millet-lentil, while minimum with fodder sorghum-mustard-blackgram system. The highest weed seed density of broad-leaved weeds was noted at 0-15 cm depth in maize-pigeonpea and the lowest with conventionally tilled direct-seeded rice (CTDSR)-mustard-blackgram system. It was concluded that diverse cropping systems significantly suppress weed density  and biomass in all the seasons.  

Email

jsmishra31@gmail.com

Address

Division of Crop Research, ICAR RCER Patna, Bihar 800014, India
Impact of nutrient management in rice-maize-greengram cropping system and integrated weed management treatments on summer greengram productivity
Dibakar Ghosh, Koushik Brahmachari, Sukamal Sarkar, Nirmal Kumar Dinda, Anupam Das and Debojyoti Moulick

KEYWORDS:

Brassica seed meal; Neem cake; Integrated weed management, Herbicide; Nutrient management, Rice-maize- greengram cropping system

Abstract:

Nutrient and weed management in crops and especially cropping system play an important role to enhance productivity and sustainability in different cropping systems. A field experiment was conducted for two consecutive years to evaluate the effect of nutrient management in preceding crops and integrated weed management practices in summer greengram on weeds growth and greengram productivity. The nutrients were applied in previous rice and maize crops and greengram was grown under residual soil fertility. The inorganic nitrogenous (N) fertilizer (25% of recommended dose) was substituted with bulky organic manures [farm yard manure (FYM) and vermicompost] and concentrated organic manures [Brassica seed meal (BSM) and neem cake]. The weed management treatments comprised of: herbicide use alone [post-emergence application (PoE) of imazethapyr 100 g/ha at 25 days after sowing (DAS)] and integrated weed management approach [pre-emergence application (PE) of pendimethalin 750 g/ha at 2 DAS followed by (fb) hoeing at 25 DAS]. The addition of concentrated organic manures (BSM and neem cake) effectively reduced the germination and overall growth of the weeds probably due to released allelochemicals. The N supplementation using neem cake and BSM decreased the weed biomass and reduced the nutrient uptake by weeds, and enhanced the nutrient uptake of greengram crop which ultimately enhanced the greengram growth and seed yield. This effect was more pronounced in the second year of study due to repeated application of organic manures. In comparison to use of herbicide alone (imazethapyr), the integrated weed management (pendimethalin PE fb hoeing) reduced the weed density and biomass accumulation by ~50 and 80%, respectively. The integrated weed management also enhanced the greengram seed yield by 12 and 9% compared to herbicide usage alone during 2015 and 2016, respectively.

Email

dghoshagro@gmail.com

Address

ICAR-Indian Institute of Water Management, Bhubaneswar, Odisha 751023, India
Phalaris minor Retz. infestation in wheat crop as influenced by different rice straw management practices usage in Punjab, India
G.S. Buttar, Simerjeet Kaur, Raj Kumar and Dharminder Singh

KEYWORDS:

Happy-Seeder, Phalaris minor, Rice straw management, Rice residue burning, Residue incorporation, Transfer of technology, Wheat

Abstract:

Phalaris minor Retz. is a competitive weed in wheat crop causing significant yield losses. In the rice-wheat cropping system, rice residue burning spoils the carbon cycle, pollutes the environment and deteriorates the soil health. An extensive survey was conducted during Rabi 2018-19 to analyse the P. minor infestation and wheat crop productivity under different rice straw management practices used by farmers in their fields and compared them with conventional straw burning practice. A total of 54% of respondents reported low infestation of P. minor in the fields sown with “Happy-Seeder” while 26% and 44% respondents observed low infestation of P. minor in fields where rice straw incorporation was done with harrow and mould board plough, respectively. The low infestation of P. minor in rice residue removed fields (no burning) was reported by 38% respondents. Overall, 8% respondents reported severe infestation of P. minor in rice straw managed fields while 30% respondents reported severe infestation of P. minor in wheat fields with conventional straw burning practice. Phalaris minor infestation was lower in fields with rice residue retention or incorporation. Therefore, rice residue management should be an important integrated weed management component especially for managing multiple-resistant P. minor.  

Email

simer@pau.edu

Address

Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana, Punjab 141004, India
Effect of nitrogen and weed management practices in maize and their residual effect on succeeding groundnut
Kadiri Saimaheswari, G. Karuna Sagar, V. Chandrika, P. Sudhakar and T. Giridhara Krishna

KEYWORDS:

Groundnut, Maize, Nitrogen management, Productivity, Weed management 

Abstract:

A field experiment was conducted to evaluate nitrogen and weed management practices in maize and their residual effect in groundnut during two consecutive rainy (Kharif) and winter (Rabi) seasons of 2019-20 and 2020-21 at Dryland Farm, S. V. Agricultural College, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh, India. Among nitrogen (N) management practices, lower weed density and biomass were registered with control, whereas Green Seeker-directed N management (GSNM) recorded significantly higher kernel and stover yield in maize. Hand weeding twice at 15 and 30 days after sowing (DAS) significantly lowered the weed density and biomass and improved maize kernel and stover yield. This was closely followed by pre-emergence application (PE) of atrazine 1.0 kg/ha followed by (fb) post-emergence application (PoE) of topramezone 30 g/ha and atrazine 1.0 kg/ha PE fb tembotrione 120 g/ha PoE. Among all the treatment combinations, higher kernel and stover yield of maize was recorded with GSNM and hand weeding twice (15 and 30 DAS). Nitrogen management practices executed in preceding maize did not exert any significant influence on weed and growth parameters in succeeding groundnut. Lower weed density and biomass were recorded with hand weeding twice (15 and 30 DAS), which was at par with brown manuring, atrazine 1.0 kg/ha PE fb topramezone 30 g/ha or tembotrione 120 g/ha PoE.

Email

saimaheswarikadiri@gmail.com

Address

Department of Agronomy, S.V. Agricultural College, Tirupati, Andhra Pradesh 517502, India
Efficacy of XR-848 benzyl ester + penoxsulam (ready-mix) in managing weeds in dry direct-seeded rice
Y.M. Ramesha, Siddaram, Veeresh Hatti and D. Krishnamurthy

KEYWORDS:

Dry direct-seeded rice, Hand weeding, Herbicides, Weed control efficiency, Weed management

Abstract:

A field study was conducted during rainy (Kharif) seasons of 2016 and 2017 at Agricultural Research Station, Dhadesugur, University of Agricultural Sciences, Raichur, Karnataka, India to study the efficacy of XR-848 benzyl ester + penoxsulam (ready-mix) in managing weeds in dry direct-seeded rice. The dominant weeds in the field were: Echinochloa colona, Panicum repens, Cynodon dactylon, Brachiaria mutica, Digitaria sanguinalis and Leptochloa chinensis among grasses, Eclipta alba, Commelina communis and Ludwigia parviflora among broad-leaved weeds and the sedge, Cyperus iria. The post-emergence application (PoE) of XR-848 benzyl ester + penoxsulam (ready-mix) 48.8 g/ha significantly reduced weed biomass, recorded higher weed control efficiency and rice grain yield during 2016 and 2017 Kharif seasons. It was on par with XR-848 benzyl ester + penoxsulam (ready-mix) 40.6 g/ha PoE and hand weeding twice at 20 and 40 days after sowing. 

Email

siddaramwaded@gmail.com

Address

ARS, Dhadesugur, 2College of Agriculture, Kalaburagi and 4ARS, Hagari (UAS, Raichur, Karnataka) and 3Directorate of Research, SDAU, Sardarkrushinagar (Gujarat)
Effect of irrigation level and weed management practices on wheat growth, yield and economics
Ashok N. Chaudhary, Arvind M. Patel, Vinod B. Mor and Hira N. Chaudhary

KEYWORDS:

Clodinafop-propargyl, Herbicides, Irrigation, Metsulfuron-methyl, Weed management, Wheat 

Abstract:

An experiment was conducted at Sardarkrushinagar Dantiwada Agricultural University (SDAU), Sardarkrushinagar, Gujarat during two consecutive winter (Rabi) seasons of the years 2014-15 and 2015-16. The experiment consisted of twenty-one treatments with three levels of irrigation (0.6, 0.8, 1.0 IW:CPE ratio) as main plot treatments and seven weed management practices as sub-plot treatments. A split-plot design with three replications was used. The crop irrigated at 1.0 IW: CPE recorded significantly higher growth parameters, yield attributes, grain and straw yield. Among weed management practices, hand weeding twice and metsulfuron-methyl 4 g/ha at 28 DAS recorded significantly higher yield attributes, grain and straw yield. Interaction between irrigation levels and weed control practices revealed that wheat irrigated at 1.0 IW: CPE in combinations with two hands weeding or metsulfuron-methyl 4 g/ha and clodinafop + metsulfuron-methyl (ready-mix) 60 g/ha produced significantly higher grain yield than other treatments. The economic analysis revealed that irrigation at 1.0 IW:CPE ratio recorded significantly higher net returns of  66188/ha and B:C 2.11. Among weed management treatment, metsulfuron-methyl 4 g/ha) PoE attained maximum net income of  34036/ha with B: C 2.16 and next best was clodinafop + metsulfuron-methyl (ready-mix) 60 g/ha which fetched next highest net income ( 30843/ha) and B:C (2.01). 

Email

ashokjegoda@gmail.com

Address

Agronomy Instructional Farm, C.P. College of Agriculture, Sardarkrushinagar Dantiwada Agricultural University, Sardarkrushinagar, Gujarat 385001, India
Effect of tillage and weed control measures on the yield and economic efficiency of maize under rainfed conditions of semi-arid region
V.K. Wasnik, P.K. Ghosh, Hanamant M. Halli and G. Gupta

KEYWORDS:

Economics, Maize, Production efficiency, Weed management, Zero tillage

Abstract:

A field experiment was conducted for two years (2015 and 2016) to study the impact of tillage and weed management practices on weed control, grain yield and the economic efficiency of maize (Zea mays L.) in the semi-arid region of central India. The study was conducted in split-plot design with two tillage practices: conventional tillage (CT) and zero tillage (ZT), randomly allotted to main plots and four weed control treatments, viz. pre-emergence application (PE) of atrazine 1.0 kg/ha; post-emergence application (PoE) of 2, 4-D 0.75 kg/ha; hand weeding twice at 20 and 40 days after sowing (DAS) and weedy check, into subplots and replicated thrice. CT recorded significantly lowest weed density and biomass and highest maize grain yield (3.01 t/ha), net returns ( 29.77×103/ha) and maize production efficiency (28.07 kg/ha/day). Amongst weed control treatments the hand weeding twice at 20 and 40 DAS resulted in the lowest weed density and biomass and highest maize grain yield (3.17 t/ha) and production efficiency (29.64 kg/ha/day). However, atrazine 1.0 kg/ha PE has resulted in to the highest net returns ( 30.30×103/ha) and maize economic efficiency ( 283/ha/day). Thus, CT with hand weedings twice at 20 and 40 DAS and atrazine 1.0 kg/ha PE at 2 DAS proved better to improve weed control efficiency and attain higher maize grain yield, and economic efficiency.

Email

hmhalli4700@gmail.com

Address

ICAR-Indian Grassland and Fodder Research Institute, Jhansi, Uttar Pradesh 284003, India
Enhanced biological control of Parthenium by release of female dominated sex ratio population of Zygogramma bicolorata Pallister
Sushilkumar, Lavkush Kumar and Yogita Gharde

KEYWORDS:

Biological control, Biocontrol efficiency, Body weight, Body size, Sex ratio, Sexual dimorphism, Parthenium, Zygogramma bicolorat

Abstract:

Parthenium hysterophorus L. (Asteraceae) is a major weed in both cropped and non-crooped areas of India and many other countries. Considering the magnitude of problems caused by P. hysterophorus, its management is essential to prevent future complications. Leaf-feeding beetle Zygogramma bicolorata Pallister (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) has been proved as the most promising biocontrol agent of Parthenium in India and other countries. In the present study, sex ratio and sexual dimorphism of Z. bicolorata was studied using field samples collected during September month of 2013 to 2015 from different sites at Jabalpur (Madhya Pradesh, India). The male and female average sex ratio was observed as 1:1.50, 1:1.61 and 1:1.46 in 2013, 2014 and 2015, respectively. Sex ratio was significantly deviated towards the female. Females were distinctly larger and heavier in body size and abdominal width than the males. Further, experiments were conducted during rainy season of 2015 and 2016 to find out the effect of female dominated sex ratio, body weight and size by releasing of 7500 beetles/ha in two sex ratio viz. 1: 1 and 1: 1.60. Significant difference was recorded amongst these two sex ratios on density, height of plants, dry weight and number of flowers in Parthenium weed at 30 and 60 days after release of bioagent. Significantly higher effect of female dominated sex ratio (1:1.60) release was found in suppression of Parthenium. Therefore, for better and assured control, female dominated releases were recommended under biological control programme of Parthenium. 

Email

sknrcws@gmail.com

Address

ICAR-Directorate of Weed Research, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh 482004, India
Sole and sequential application of herbicides for economical weed management in blackgram
S. Tripathy, S. Mohapatra, S.K. Tripathy and A.K. Mohanty

KEYWORDS:

Blackgram, Clodinafop-propargyl + acifluorfen, Imazethapyr, Oxyfluorfen, Sequential application, Weed management

Abstract:

A field experiment was conducted at Regional Research and Technology Transfer Station, Chiplima, Odisha, India during the winter (Rabi) seasons of 2019-20 and 2020-21 to study the effect of sole and sequential application of herbicides for weed management in blackgram (Vigna mungo L.). The treatment combinations consisted pre-emergence herbicides, viz. pendimethalin and oxyfluorfen and post-emergence herbicides, viz. imazethapyr and clodinafop-propargyl + acifluorfen (ready-mix) in different rates along with weed free and weedy check. The weed competition resulted in 37.6% yield loss in blackgram. The pre-emergence application (PE) of oxyfluorfen 200 g/ha at 1 days after seeding (DAS) followed by (fb) post-emergence application of imazethapyr75 g/ha at 20 DAS caused 89.5% reduction in weed biomass with higher weed control efficiency (89.4%) and blackgram yield (0.77 t/ha). The net return ( 24.9 x 103/ha) and benefit: cost ratios (2.0) were also higher with this treatment and hence be recommended in West Central Table Land Zone of Odisha for better weed control, seed yield and higher economic returns in blackgram.

Email

santanu_kt@yahoo.co.in

Address

Regional Research and Technology Transfer Station, Chiplima, Odisha 768 025, India
Influence of mulch-based weed management in organic turmeric production
B.D. Patel, D.D. Chaudhari and V.J. Patel

KEYWORDS:

Curcuma longa, Organic cultivation, Mulching, Rice straw mulch, Turmeric, Weed management, Wheat straw mulch

Abstract:

A study was carried out during two consecutive years (2018-19 and 2019-20) on a loamy sand soil at Anand, Gujarat, India to study the effectiveness of mulch-based weed management in organically grown turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) production. The wheat straw mulch 5 t/ha applied at 0-3 days after planting (DAP) fb hand weeding (HW) at 30, 60 and 90 DAP and rice straw mulch 5 t/ha (0-3 DAP) fb HW at 30, 60 and 90 DAP were found equally effective in reducing weed biomass with higher weed control efficiency. Both these treatments resulted in significantly higher rhizome yield with higher net return and benefit cost ratio of 1.79 and 1.77, respectively.

Email

bdpatel62@yahoo.com

Address

B.A. College of Agriculture, Anand Agricultural University, Anand, Gujarat 388110, India
Effect of herbicides in managing weeds and on Gladiolus hybridus Hort. growth and flowering
K.K. Dhatt and Tanya Thakur

KEYWORDS:

Gladiolus hybridus Hort., Herbicides, Metribuzin, Weed management

Abstract:

An experiment was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of herbicides application in   managing weeds and improving the gladiolus (Gladiolus hybridus Hort. cv. Novalux) growth and flowering.  Treatments evaluated include: two doses each of atrazine, metribuzin, butachlor, pendimethalin and two controls, viz. weed free and weedy.  All herbicide treatments significantly (p=0.05) affected the G. hybridus plant growth, flowering and associated weeds growth. Butachlor 1.0 kg/ha pre-emergence application (PE) recorded significantly greater plant height (90.23 cm), number of florets (12.46) while weed free control recorded significantly maximum spike length (60.64 cm) and floret size (7.58 cm).  Metribuzin 0.25   kg/ha PE was at par with these treatments. All herbicide treatments caused significant reduction in weed density. Weed free control and metribuzin 0.25 kg/ha PE were most effective in reducing weed density, fresh and dry weed biomass with highest weed control efficiency and weed control index. Metribuzin at 0.25 kg/ha PE could be recommended for controlling the weeds and improving growth and flowering of Gladiolus hybridus cv. Novalux.  

Email

tanyathakurflori@gmail.com

Address

Department of Floriculture and Landscaping, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana, Punjab 141004, India
The enhancement of root yield and quality of ashwagandha [Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal] by weeds leaves extracts
Abdul Mazeed, Pooja Maurya, Dipender Kumar, Priyanka Suryavanshi

KEYWORDS:

Ashwagandha, Bio-stimulants, Weed leaves extracts, Bio-fertilizers, Root yield and quality, Withania somnifera

Abstract:

Ashwagandha, having multiple therapeutic uses, is a highly valuable medicinal plant for pharmaceutical industry. In order to meet the industrial demand, both quality as well as yield of ashwagandha needs to be improved agronomically. In this study, effect of weed leaves extracts (WLE) as bio-stimulants to improve yield and quality of ashwagandha roots were studied in pot experiments during 2020-21. The treatments consisted of combinations of four commercial preparations with microorganisms (Pusa zinc solubilizing biofertilizer, Pusa Azotobacter liquid biofertilizer, Pusa PSB liquid biofertilizer, Pusa Potash solubilizing liquid biofertilizer) with four weeds [Cyperus rotundus L., Amaranthus viridis L., Echinochloa colona (L.) Link, Digera arvensis Forsk.] leaves extracts. The treated plants exhibited stimulatory responses in growth and physiology, leading to enhanced dry root yield of ashwagandha compared to control. Yield enhancing effects of different treatments, when used separately, without combination was the highest in case of Amaranthus viridis WLE, followed by Digera arvensis WLE and PSB solubilizing biofertilizer, however co-application resulted in synergistic effect. Among different combination of treatments, Pusa PSB liquid biofertilizer + Amaranthus viridis WLE recorded the highest whole ashwagandha plant dry matter production (157.3 g/plant), root fresh weight per plant (65.0 g) and root dry weight (23.0 g). Different bioactive compounds in ashwagandha roots (withanoloides A, withanosides IV and withanone) were also enhanced with this treatment indicating the potentiality of weed leaves extracts as biostimulants, with a possibility to use as a novel eco-friendly approach for enhancing root yield and quality of ashwagandha. 

Email

priyanka@cimap.res.in

Address

Division of Crop Production and Protection, CSIR- Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh 226015, India
Non chemical weed management in organically grown direct-seeded aerobic upland rice in newly cleared forest area
Amit A. Shahane and U.K. Behera

KEYWORDS:

Aerobic rice, Mechanical weeding, Non-chemical weed management, Organic production system, Sahbhagi Dhan

Abstract:

A field experiment was conducted in newly cleared forest area under organic production system at College of Agriculture (CAU-I), Kyrdemkulai, Meghalaya, India during rainy (Kharif) season of 2020. The objective of experiment was to evaluate timing and frequency of manual and mechanical methods of weed management on weeds, growth and yield of direct-seeded upland aerobic rice. The grain yield for both Sahbhagi Dhan and Bhalum-1 rice varieties was highest in weed free and it was at par with yield in mechanical weeding twice at 23-25 and 45-50 days after seeding (DAS).The manual and mechanical weeding didn’t differ significantly due to the use of higher seed rate, lower weed density and uniform distribution of inter and intra-row weeds. The mechanical weeding was found economical than manual weeding due to lesser labour and time requirements for weeding. 

Email

aashahaneagro@gmail.com

Address

College of Agriculture (CAU-I), Kyrdemkulai, Meghalaya 793 105, India
Impact of sole and sequential application of herbicides on weeds, nutrients uptake and productivity of maize
Gharsiram, Mukesh Kumar, Mritunjay Kumar and Devendra Singh

KEYWORDS:

Atrazine, Maize, Nutrient uptake by weeds, Tembotrione, Topramezone, Weed management

Abstract:

A field experiment was carried out during rainy (Kharif) season 2019 at agricultural research farm of Trihut College of Agriculture (TCA), Dholi under Rajendra Prasad Central Agricultural University (RPCAU) Pusa, Samastipur, Bihar, (India) to quantify the efficacy of sole and sequential application of herbicides in managing weeds and enhance the productivity of maize (Zea mays L.). Eleven treatments were tested in randomised block design with three replications. Atrazine 1.0 kg/ha pre-emergence application (PE) followed by (fb) post-emergence application (PoE) of tembotrione 0.120 kg/ha at 25 days after seeding (DAS) significantly reduced weed density, weed biomass, N, P, K removal by weeds and increased the yield attributes, grain yield and benefit-cost ratio of maize compared to sole and tank mixed application of atrazine, topramezone and tembotrione.

Email

mukesh.agro@gmail.com

Address

Department of Agronomy, Dr Rajendra Prasad Central Agricultural University, Pusa, Samastipur, Bihar 848125, India
Effect of weeds control measures on weeds and yield of pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum L.]
S.R. Samota, S.P. Singh, Hansraj Shivran, Ranjeet Singh and A.S. Godara

KEYWORDS:

Atrazine, 2,4-D, Herbicides, Hoeing, Pearle millet, Pennisetum glaucum L., Weed management 

Abstract:

A field experiment was conducted at the Instructional Farm, Agricultural Research Station, S.K. Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner, Rajasthan during rainy (Kharif) season 2018 to identify effective weed control measures to manage weeds and increase yield of pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum L.]. The experiment was laid out in randomised block design having 12 treatments with three replications. The pre-emergence application (PE) of atrazine 0.5 kg/ha was significantly superior in reducing weed density and biomass of both broad-leaved and grassy weeds.Weed free, atrazine 0.5 kg/ha PE and post-emergence application (PoE) of 2,4-D 0.5 kg/ha at 30 days after seeding (DAS), hand hoeing twice at 20 and 40 DAS and hand wheel hoeing twice at 20 and 40 DAS registered 2.48, 2.42, 2.39, 2.33 and 2.28 t/ha seed yield, respectively as against 1.31 t/ha seed yield in weedy check. The maximum gross returns of  86360/ha was recorded under weed free treatment while highest B:C ratio was recorded with 2,4-D 0.5 kg/ha PoE at 30 DAS (3.17), which was closely followed by atrazine 0.5 kg/ha PE (3.16).

Email

spbhakar@gmail.com

Address

College of Agriculture, Swami Keshwanand Rajasthan Agricultural University, Bikaner, Rajasthan 334006, India
Comparative efficacy of herbicides and hand weeding in managing weeds in irrigated summer finger millet (Eleusine coracana L. Gaertn.)
Likhita Kumari Mohanty, M. Roja, and M. Devender Reddy

KEYWORDS:

Bispyribac-sodium, Ethoxysulfuron, Finger millet, Herbicides, Oxadiargyl, Pendimethalin, Weed management

Abstract:

A field experiment was conducted at M.S. Swaminathan School of Agriculture, Bagusala farm, Gajapati district, Odisha during the summer season of 2020 to assess the comparative efficacy of herbicides and hand weeding in managing weeds and improve productivity of irrigated summer finger millet (Eleusine coracana L. Gaertn.). The pre-emergence herbicide application (PE) of pendimethalin 500 g/ha or oxadiargyl 80 g/ha PE at 3 days after transplanting (DAT) followed by post-emergence application (PoE) of ethoxysulfuron 12 g/ha or bispyribac- sodium 20 g/ha at 20 DAT were found to be equally effective as hand weeding twice at 20 and 40 DAT in effectively managing weeds and improving the productivity of finger millet.

Email

likhitalikky917@gmail.com

Address

Department of Agronomy, M.S. Swaminathan School of Agriculture, Centurion University of Technology and Management, Paralakhemundi, Odisha 761211, India
Impact of integration of inter-cultivation, herbicides and manual weeding in winter groundnut yield
N. Charitha, M. Madhavi, G. Pratibha and T. Ramprakash

KEYWORDS:

Diclosulam, Groundnut, Iimazethapyr + pendimethalin (ready-mix), Inter-cultivation, Sodium acifluorfen + clodinofop- propargyl (ready-mix) and Weed control efficiency

Abstract:

A field experiment was conducted in sandy loam soils at College of Agriculture, Professor Jayashankar Telangana State Agricultural University, Hyderabad, during winter (Rabi) season 2020-21. The objective was to study the effect of integration of inter-cultivation with pre- and post-emergence application of herbicides and manual weeding on weeds growth and yield of groundnut. A randomized block design, replicated thrice was used with ten treatments. The broad-spectrum weed control, lower weed biomass, higher weed control efficiency, higher groundnut pod and haulm yield were obtained with inter-cultivation followed by (fb) hand weeding at 20 and 40 days after sowing (DAS). The herbicides based integration revealed the greater weed management efficacy of pre-emergence application (PE) of diclosulam at 26 g/ha fb inter-cultivation at 20 DAS. The next best options for higher WCE and pod yield were imazethapyr + pendimethalin (ready-mix) at 960 g/ha PE fb inter-cultivation at 20 DAS and sodium acifluorfen + clodinofop- propargyl 250 g/ha fb inter-cultivation at 40 DAS.

Email

charitha183@gmail.com

Address

Department of Agronomy, PJTSAU, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500030, India
Weed management with pre- and post-emergence herbicide under varying tillage systems in chickpea grown after sorghum
Tony Manoj Kumar N. and A.R. Sharma

KEYWORDS:

Chickpea, Clodinafop-propargyl + Na-acifluorfen, Pendimethalin, Sorghum residue, Weed management, Zero tillage

Abstract:

An experiment was conducted during 2019–20 at Rani Lakshmi Bai Central Agricultural University (RLBCAU), Jhansi to evaluate the effect of tillage and weed management treatments on weeds and productivity of chickpea grown after sorghum. Major broad-leaved weeds were: Anagallis arvensis (48%), Spergula arvensis (12.3%), Medicago denticulata (8.6%), Melilotus alba (8.0%); and narrow-leaved, Cyperus rotundus (17.0%) and Dactyloctenium aegyptium (2.7%). Adoption of zero tillage (ZT) and ZT+ residue retention increased mean grain yield of chickpea by 10.6 and 21.1%, respectively over the conventional tillage (CT). Pre-emergence application (PE) of pendimethalin 1.0 kg/ha followed by (fb) post-emergence application (PoE) of clodinafop-propargyl + Na-acifluorfen 122.5 g/ha at 30 DAS controlled weeds effectively and resulted in 8.6, 19.3 and 43.5% more grain yield than pendimethalin fb hand weeding, pendimethalin alone and unweeded check, respectively. It was concluded that clodinafop-propargyl + Na-acifluorfen proved to be a good substitute for hand weeding at 30 DAS but its dose and timing of application need to be further standardized at different locations.

Email

tonymanoj98@gmail.com

Address

Rani Lakshmi Bai Central Agricultural University, Jhansi, Uttar Pradesh 284003, India
Weed management in chickpea at South Saurashtra of Gujarat, India
D. Manasa, P.K. Chovatia and R.K. Kathiria

KEYWORDS:

Chickpea, Hand weeding, Herbicides, Sodium-acifluorfen + clodinafop-propargyl, Weed management

Abstract:

A field experiment was conducted during winter (Rabi) season of 2019-20 at Instructional Farm, Department of Agronomy, College of Agriculture, JAU, Junagadh, Gujarat, India, to study the effect of different weed management treatments on weeds, yield attributes and yield of chickpea. The experiment comprised of twelve treatments laid out in randomized block design with three replications. Significantly higher plant height, number of branches / plant, number of pods/plant, seed yield and stover yield, were recorded with pre-emergence application (PE) of pendimethalin 900 g/ha followed by (fb) post-emergence application (PoE) of sodium-acifluorfen + clodinafop-propargyl 80 + 165 g/ha ready-mix (RM) at 40 DAS and hand weeding (HW) twice at 20 and 40 days after seeding (DAS) as they effectively minimized the weed biomass and lowered weed index with higher weed control efficiency. The highest net return and B:C ratio were recorded with pendimethalin 900 g/ha PE fb sodium-acifluorfen + clodinafop-propargyl 80 + 165 g/ha (RM) PoE at 40 DAS followed by alachlor 750 g/ha PE fb sodium-acifluorfen + clodinafop-propargyl 80 +165 g/ha (RM) PoE at 40 DAS and HW twice at 20 and 40 DAS. 

Email

manasad98jathavara@gmail.com

Address

Department of Agronomy, College of Agriculture, Junagadh Agricultural University, Junagadh, Gujarat 362001, India

Indexing Indexing & Abstracting Services